10                     Landscape and Visual ImpactsLogo

10.1                Introduction

Background

10.1.1          The following section is a Landscape and Visual Impact Assessment (LVIA) for the TKO-LT Tunnel project in accordance with Annex 10 and 18 of the Technical Memorandum on Environmental Impact Assessment Process, EIAO Guidance Note No. 8/2010 and the project EIA Study Brief No. ESB-195/2008.

EIA Study Brief

10.1.2          The TKO-LT Tunnel project is a designated project under Schedule 2 of the Environmental Impact Assessment Ordinance (EIAO). An EIA Study Brief No. ESB-195/2008 was issued by the Director of Environmental Protection on 26th August 2008 to CEDD for an EIA Study of the TKO-LT Tunnel. A separate but related EIA Study Brief No. ESB-196/2008 was issued at the same time for the CBL and the LVIA aspects of both EIAs are to be closely coordinated at the TKO interface.

Content of this Section

10.1.3          The contents of the following sub-sections of this section are described below:

P               Section 10.1 provides an introduction, describes the EIA Study Brief and provides a description of the content of the LVIA forming Section 10 of the EIA.

P               Section 10.2 describes the environmental legislation, standards and criteria upon which the LVIA is based;

P               Section 10.3 provides the assessment methodology for the LVIA;

P               Section 10.4 provides the scope and content of the study, outlines the limit of study area and provides the project description, review of planning and development control framework, tentative programme and identifies the concurrent projects;

P               Section 10.5 provides the baseline study which outlines the physical Landscape Resources and Landscape Character Areas and their sensitivity, tree survey data, the visual envelope, the Visually Sensitive Receivers and their sensitivity and magnitude of impact;

P               Section 10.6 provides the landscape impact assessment with a description of the sources of potential landscape impacts, the predicted magnitude of impact and the resulting significance of impact on each Landscape Resource and Landscape Character Area;

P               Section 10.7 provides the visual impact assessment with a description of the sources of potential visual impacts, the predicted magnitude of impact and the resulting significance of impact on each Visually Sensitive Receiver;

P               Section 10.8 describes the mitigation measures, the environmental monitoring and audit requirements, the photomontages and the rationale for selecting the photomontage viewpoints;

P               Section 10.9 provides the evaluation of residual and the cumulative landscape and visual impacts;

P               Section 10.10 provides a summary and conclusions, outlines the compatibility of TKO-LT Tunnel with planning intent and summarises the residual landscape and visual impacts; and

P               Section 10.11 provides the overall conclusion in accordance with the criteria and guidelines for evaluating and assessing impacts as stated in Annex 10 and 18 of the TM of the EIAO.


10.2                Environmental Legislation, Standards and Criteria

Relevant Standards

10.2.1          The methodology for undertaking the landscape and visual impact assessment is in accordance with Annex 10 and 18 of the Technical Memorandum on Environment Impact Assessment Process, EIAO Guidance Note No. 8/2010 and the EIA Study Brief No. ESB-195/2008. The following legislation, standards and guidelines are applicable to the evaluation of landscape and visual impacts associated with the construction and operation of the proposed TKO-LT Tunnel:

P               Animals and Plants (Protection of Endangered Species) Ordinance (Cap. 187);

P               Country Parks Ordinance (Cap. 208);

P               Environmental Impact Assessment Ordinance (Cap. 499, section 16) and the Technical Memorandum on EIA Process (EIAO-TM), particularly Annexes 10, 11, 18, 20 and 21;

P               Environmental Impact Assessment Ordinance Guidance Note (EIAO GN) 8/2010;

P               ETWB TC No. 34/2003 V Community Involvement in Greening Works;

P               ETWB TC No. 29/2004 V Registration of Old & Valuable Trees and Guidelines for their Preservation;

P               ETWB TC No. 2/2004 V Maintenance of Vegetation and Hard Landscape Features;

P               ETWB TC No. 11/2004 V Cyber Manual for Greening;

P               ETWB TC No. 5/2005 V Protection of Natural Streams/Rivers from Adverse Impacts Arising from Construction Works;

P               ETWB TC No. 10/2005 V Planting on Footbridges and Flyovers;

P               ETWB TC No. 3/2006 V Tree Preservation;

P               Forests and Countryside Ordinance (Cap. 96) and its subsidiary legislation the Forestry Regulations;

P               GEO 1/2011 V Technical Guidelines on Landscape Treatment for Slopes;

P               GEO Publication (1999) V Use of Vegetation as Surface Protection on Slopes;

P               Hong Kong Planning Standards and Guidelines (HK PSG);

P               Land Administration Office Guidance Note (LAO GN) No. 7/2007 V Tree Preservation and Tree Removal Application for Building Development in Private Projects;

P               Landscape Value Mapping Study of Hong Kong;

P               Approved Tseung Kwan O Outline Zoning Plan No. S/TKO/20, Approved Cha Kwo Ling, Yau Tong, Lei Yue Mun Outline Zoning Plan No. S/K15/19 and current Outline Zoning Plan for Kai Tak No. S/K22/4; and current Kwun Tong South OZP No. S/K14S/17;

P               Protection of Endangered Species of Animals and Plants Ordinance (Cap. 586);

P               SILTech Publication (1991) V Tree Planting and Maintenance in Hong Kong (Standing Interdepartmental Landscape Technical Group);

P               Town Planning Ordinance (Cap. 131);

P               DEVB TC(W) no. 3/2012 V Site coverage of Greenery for Government; Building Projects;

P               DEVB publication (April 2012) V Guidelines on Greening of Noise Enclosure;

P               WBTC No. 7/2002 V Tree Planting in Public Works;

P               WBTC No. 36/2004 V Advisory Committee on the Appearance of Bridges and Associated Structures (ACABAS).

 


10.3                Assessment Methodology

Assessment of Landscape Impacts

10.3.1        Landscape and visual impacts have been assessed separately for the Construction and Operational Phases, following the methodology set out in EIAO GN 8/2010.

10.3.2        The assessment of landscape impacts has adopted the following procedures:

P         Identification of the baseline physical and cultural Landscape Resources (LRs) and Landscape Character Areas (LCAs) found within the assessment area:. This is achieved by site visits and desk-top study of topographical maps, information databases and photographs.

P         Assessment of the degree of sensitivity of the LRs and LCAs: This is influenced by a number of factors including whether the resource/character is common or rare, whether it is considered to be of local, regional, national or global importance, whether there are any statutory or regulatory limitations/ requirements relating to the resource, the quality of the resource/character, the maturity of the resource, and the ability of the resource/character to accommodate change. The sensitivity of each landscape feature and character area is classified as follows:

High

LR or LCA of particularly distinctive character or high importance, sensitive to relatively small changes

 

Medium

LR or LCA of moderately valued landscape characteristics reasonably tolerant to change

 

Low

LR or LCA, the nature of which is largely tolerant to change

 

P         Identification of potential sources of landscape impacts: These are the various elements of the construction works and operational procedures that will generate landscape impacts. Landscape impacts may be beneficial/adverse, direct/indirect, short/long-tem, reversible/irreversible and cumulative. Impacts in this report are adverse unless specifically stated as positive.

P         Identification of the magnitude of landscape impacts: The magnitude of the impact depends on a number of factors including the physical extent of the impact, the landscape and visual context of the impact, the compatibility of the Project with the surrounding landscape; and the time-scale of the impact V i.e. whether it is temporary (short, medium or long term), permanent but potentially reversible, or permanent and irreversible. Landscape impacts have been quantified wherever possible. The magnitude of landscape impacts is classified as follows:

Large

The LR or LCA would suffer major change

 

Intermediate

The LR or LCA would suffer moderate change

 

Small

The LR or LCA would suffer slight or barely perceptible change

 

Negligible

The LR or LCA would suffer no discernible change

 

10.3.3          Identification of potential landscape mitigation measures: These may take the form of adopting alternative designs or revisions to the basic engineering and architectural design to prevent and/or minimise adverse impacts; remedial measures such as colour and textural treatment of building features; and compensatory measures such as the implementation of landscape design measures (eg. tree planting, creation of new open space, etc.) to compensate for unavoidable adverse impacts and to attempt to generate potentially positive long term impacts. The proposed mitigation measures for the project and the agencies responsible for the funding, implementation, management and maintenance of the mitigation measures are identified in Table 10.8.1. and Table 10.8.2.

10.3.4          Prediction of the significance of landscape impacts before and after the implementation of the mitigation measures: By synthesising the magnitude of the various impacts and the sensitivity of the various landscape resources it is possible to categorise impacts in a logical, well-reasoned and consistent fashion. Table 10.3.1 shows the rationale for dividing the degree of significance into four thresholds, namely Insubstantial, Slight, Moderate, and Substantial, depending on the combination of a negligible-small-intermediate-large magnitude of change and a low-medium-high degree of sensitivity of landscape resource/character. The significant thresholds are defined as follows:

Substantial

Adverse/beneficial impact where the proposal would cause significant deterioration or improvement in existing landscape quality

Moderate

Adverse/beneficial impact where the proposal would cause a noticeable deterioration or improvement in existing landscape quality

Slight

Adverse/beneficial impact where the proposal would cause a barely perceptible deterioration or improvement in existing landscape quality

Insubstantial

No discernible change in the existing landscape quality

 

10.3.5          Prediction of Acceptability of Impacts: An overall assessment of the significance of the impacts according to the five criteria set out in Annex 10 of the EIAO-TM is summarized in Table 10.3.1 below:

Table 10.3.1 Evaluation of Significance of Landscape and Visual Impacts

Magnitude of Impact (Change)

Large

Moderate

Moderate/

Substantial

Substantial

Intermediate

Slight/

Moderate

Moderate

Moderate/

Substantial

Small

Slight

Slight/

Moderate

Moderate

 

Negligible

Insubstantial

Insubstantial

Insubstantial

 

 

Low

Medium

High

 

 

Sensitivity to change (of Landscape Resource, Landscape Character Area or VSR)

10.3.6          Conclusion: from an analysis of the significance thresholds derived for landscape (and visual) impacts, an overall conclusion in terms of impact significance for the project is determined in accordance with the five evaluation criteria set out in Annex 10 of the EIAO-TM:

Beneficial

The project impact is beneficial if it will complement the landscape and visual character of its setting, will follow the relevant planning objectives and will improve overall visual amenity.

Acceptable

The project impact is acceptable if the assessment indicates that there will be no significant effects on the landscape, no significant visual effects caused by the appearance of the project, or no interference with key views.

Acceptable with Mitigation Measures

The project impact is acceptable with mitigation measures if there will be some adverse effects, but these can be eliminated, reduced or offset to a large extent by specific measures.

Unacceptable

The project impact is unacceptable if the adverse effects are considered too excessive and are unable to be practically mitigated.

Undetermined

The project impact is undetermined if significant adverse effects are likely, but the extent to which they may occur or may be mitigated cannot be determined from the study. Further detailed study will be required of the specific effects in question.

Assessment of Visual Impacts

10.3.7          The assessment of visual impacts has adopted the following procedures:

P         Identification of the Zone of Visual Influence (ZVI) during the Construction and Operational Phases of the Project: This is achieved by site visit and desk-top study of topographic maps and photographs, and preparation of cross-sections to determine visibility of the Project from various locations. The ZVI is the view shed from which the project can be seen and is defined by natural landform and man-made building structures.

P         Identification of the Visually Sensitive Receivers (VSRs) within the ZVI during the Construction and Operational Phases: These are the people who would reside within, work within, play within, or travel through, the ZVI.

P         Assessment of the degree of sensitivity to change of the VSRs: This is influenced by the type of VSRs, which is classified according to whether the person is at home, at work, at play, or travelling. Those who view the impact from their homes are considered to be highly sensitive as the attractiveness or otherwise of the outlook from their home will have a substantial effect on their perception of the quality and acceptability of their home environment and their general quality of life. Those who view the impact from their workplace are considered to be of low sensitivity as the attractiveness or otherwise of the outlook will have a less important, although still material, effect on their perception of their quality of life. The degree to which this applies may vary depending on whether the workplace is industrial, retail or commercial. Those who view the impact whilst taking part in an outdoor leisure activity may display varying sensitivity depending on the type of leisure activity. Those who view the impact whilst travelling on a public thoroughfare will also display varying sensitivity depending on the speed of travel. The degree to which this applies is also influenced by the value and quality of existing views; the availability and amenity of alternative views; the duration or frequency of view, the degree of visibility and the numbers of receivers. The sensitivity of each VSR is classified as follows:

High

The VSR is highly sensitive to any change in their viewing experience

 

Medium

The VSR is moderately sensitive to any change in their viewing experience

 

Low

The VSR is only slightly sensitive to any change in their viewing experience

P         Assessment of the potential magnitude of visual impacts: This includes consideration of the compatibility with the visual character of the surrounding landscape under the Construction and Operation Phase; the duration of the impact; scale of the development in the view; the reversibility of the impact; the distance of the source of impact from the viewer; and the change / blockage to the character of existing views. (Note: for the purposes of this assessment, those VSRs within a VSR group with the greater or worst case magnitude of change are selected for assessment. For example, the VSRs on the upper floors of a tower block may experience a greater magnitude of change than those on the lower floors which may have their views obstructed by existing ground level features. In this case therefore, the magnitude of impact for the VSRs on the upper floors is assessed as it is the greater, rather than the VSRs on the lower floors).

P         The magnitude of visual impacts are classified as follows:

Large

The VSRs would suffer a major change in their viewing experience

 

Intermediate

The VSRs would suffer a moderate change in their viewing experience

 

Small

The VSRs would suffer a small change in their viewing experience

 

Negligible

The VSRs would suffer no discernible change in the character of their viewing experience

 

10.3.8          Identification of potential sources of visual impacts: These are the various elements of the construction works and operational procedures that would generate visual impacts.

10.3.9          Identification of potential visual mitigation measures: These may take the form of adopting alternative designs or revisions to the basic engineering and architectural design to prevent and/or minimise adverse impacts; remedial measures such as colour and textural treatment of building features; and compensatory measures such as the implementation of landscape design measures (e.g. tree planting, creation of new open space etc) to compensate for unavoidable adverse impacts and to attempt to generate potentially positive long term impacts. The agencies responsible for the funding, implementation, management and maintenance of the mitigation measures are identified and their approval-in-principle is being sought. Tables 10.8.1 and 10.8.2 identify these mitigation measures during the Construction and Operation Phases respectively.

10.3.10      Prediction of the significance of visual impacts before and after the implementation of the mitigation measures: By synthesising the magnitude of the various visual impacts, the sensitivity of the VSRs and the numbers of VSRs that are affected, it is possible to categorise the degree of significance of the impacts in a logical, well-reasoned and consistent fashion. Table 10.3.1 shows the rationale for dividing the degree of significance into four thresholds, namely, Insubstantial, Slight, Moderate and Substantial, depending on the combination of a negligible-small-intermediate-large magnitude of change and a low-medium-high degree of sensitivity of VSRs. Photomontages showing views of the Project from key VSRs at day 1 without mitigation, and at day 1 and year 10 with mitigation are provided. The significance of the visual impacts is categorised as follows:

Substantial

Adverse/beneficial impact where the proposal would cause significant deterioration or improvement in existing landscape visual character

 

Moderate

Adverse/beneficial impact where the proposal would cause a noticeable deterioration or improvement in existing landscape visual character

 

Slight

Adverse/positive impact where the proposal would cause a barely perceptible deterioration or improvement in existing landscape visual character

 

Insubstantial

No discernible change in the existing landscape visual character

10.4                Scope and Content of the Study

Limits of the Study Area

10.4.1          The study area for the landscape impact assessment is an area 500 meters from the work limit of the project and is indicated on Figure No. 10.4.1.

10.4.2          The area for the visual impact assessment is defined by the limits of the visual envelope (or ZVI) which forms the view shed for the visibility of the project. The ZVI is indicated on Figure No. 10.4.1.

Project Description

10.4.3          At present, the existing TKO Tunnel is the main connection between TKO and the urban areas of Kowloon and Hong Kong. According to traffic impact assessments, the existing tunnel will experience serious congestion if an alternative external road link is not provided to meet the population growth and the continuing commercial and industrial development in the TKO area. To cope with the anticipated transport need, the TKO-LT Tunnel and Cross Bay Link (CBL) are proposed to meet the long-term traffic demand between TKO and the external areas.

10.4.4          TKO-LT Tunnel, together with the proposed Trunk Road T2 (T2) in the Kai Tak Development (KTD) and Central Kowloon Route (CKR), will form Route 6 in the strategic trunk road network. Route 6 will provide an east-west highway link between Kowloon and TKO. Upon completion, this trunk road will also provide the necessary relief to the existing heavily trafficked road network in the central and eastern Kowloon areas, and reduce the related environmental impacts on these areas.

10.4.5          TKO-LT Tunnel comprises a dual two-lane highway approximately 4.2 km long, about 2.6 km of which is in the form of tunnel. At either end of the tunnel are portal facilities and road interchanges linking into existing and future road systems.

10.4.6          The project elements of relevance to the landscape and visual impact assessment on the TKO side include the following:

P              TKO interface with the CBL and the TKO Interchange comprising dual two-lane highway linking to tunnel and slip roads to Road P2;

P              The TKO tunnel portal with weight bridge and roadside kiosk with lay-by (the tunnel portal has major slope works);

P              Temporary haul road and barging point for removal of excavated slope and tunnel debris at the base of the tunnel portal;

P              Reclamation for the slip roads landing point;

P              Slip roads landing and transition into a depressed roadway beneath a landscape deck in front of Ocean Shores;

P              Road works along Road P2 including a landscape deck in front of Ocean Shores;

P              Feature footbridge connections at the junction of Road P2 and D4 (Po Yap Road).

10.4.7          The preferred engineering alignment has been selected and endorsed by the Project Steering Group following a process of option development and review. A review of the Conforming Scheme of TKO-LT Tunnel and development of alternative alignments has been conducted. The conforming scheme and the 3 major alternative tunnel alignments of the TKO Section are shown in Figure 10.1. After evaluation of the pros and cons including the respective landscape and visual aspects, of the conforming scheme and the alternative alignments and taking into account the comments received from the public engagement of the project, Alternative Alignment 3 (straight tunnel without toll plaza) has been endorsed by the Project Steering Group (PSG) as the Recommended Scheme for TKO-LT Tunnel.

10.4.8          The project elements of relevance to the landscape and visual impact assessment on the Lam Tin side include the following:

P              The Lam Tin Tunnel Portal and associated ventilation building in the north east and western walls of the Ex-Cha Kwo Ling Kaolin Mine Site;

P              The Lam Tin Interchange comprising the main highway and slip roads in the Ex-Cha Kwo Ling Kaolin Mine Site; full noise enclosure for the main highway and partial noise enclosures for the slip roads;

P              Associated buildings for the TKO-LT Tunnel including an Administration Building, a vehicle garage, a pumping station and maintenance facilities including a workshop, training ground, vehicle recovery base and petrol station;

P              Associated facilities for Trunk Road T2;

P              Road improvements at the junction of Cha Kwo Ling Road and Yau Tong Road;

P              Road improvements along Cha Kwo Ling Road including the proposed Cha Kwo Ling Roundabout;

P              Reprovisioning of the slip road from Lei Yue Mun Road onto the west bound carriageway of the EHC and the addition of Link Road EHC2;

P              Temporary waterfront barging point and elevated conveyor for removal of excavated tunnel and site formation debris.

Review of Planning and Development Control Framework

10.4.9          A review has been undertaken of the current planning goals and objectives, statutory land-use and landscape planning designations for the assessment area.

10.4.10      The relevant OZP for the project works within TKO is the Tseung Kwan O Outline Zoning Plan No. S/TKO/20, an extract of which is shown in Figure No. 10.4.2. The land uses under this Plan directly affected by the Project Site footprint are zoned as Open Space (O), Open Space 1 (O(1)), Other Specified Uses (OU), Government/ Institution/ Community 1 G/IC(1), G/IC(4), Commercial/ Residential (C/R) and Green Belt (GB) and areas designated as Road笥 and are summarised in Table 10.4.1.

Table 10.4.1

Tseung Kwan O Outline Zoning Plan No. S/TKO/20

Zones Land Uses affected by the Project

Land Use Zoning

Area Affected

Sources of Impact/ Design Intent

Future Outlook

C/R

East of junction of Po Yap Road and Po Shun Road

Road, footbridge and footpath works

Road, footbridge and footpath adjacent to mixed commercial residential development

O

Open Space zoned for future Tiu Keng Leng Park

Depressed Road P2

Landscaped Deck

O(1)

Open Space to west of junction of Po Yap Road and Po Shun Road

Road, footpath, footbridge and cycleway

Road, footpath, footbridge and cycleway adjacent to Sports Centre & Library

OU

Tseung Kwan O/Junk Bay sea area

TKO interchange plus connection to Road P2

TKO interchange plus connection to Road P2

G/IC(1)

Reclamation area zoned as Civic Node

Road, footpath, footbridge and cycleway

Road, footpath and cycleway adjacent to planned cultural complex, Government Offices and parking

G/IC(4)

Reclamation area zoned as Civic Node

Road, footpath, footbridge and cycleway

Road, footpath and cycleway adjacent to planned clinic, police station, fire station cum ambulance depot & RCP

GB

Slopes and coastal strip of Tiu Keng Leng

Tunnel Portal

Tunnel Portal

Road P2

Po Yap Road to TKO Interchange

Construction of Road P2 and footbridge crossings

Road P2 integrated into adjacent Open Space, GIC and Residential developments with signature Civic Node at junction of Po Yap Road

 

10.4.11      TKO is a third generation New Town with a unique waterfront and valley setting. A 2005 Study formulated an urban design framework to concentrate new development in the Town Centre South and Tiu Keng Leng areas on newly reclaimed land in the south and west and Pak Shing Kok in the north east. The planning vision is to create a new and distinctive waterfront district that capitalizes on the dramatic visual and physical relationship of the surrounding country parks and Junk Bay笥 with the primary objective of providing a high quality vibrant leisure and recreational area for the enjoyment of the TKO residents and visitors笥.

10.4.12      The OZP recognises the future CBL and TKO-LT Tunnel development and has indicated the corridor indicatively on plan (a 胙cross-bay bridge road绞 was indicated on the first Outline Zoning Plan for Tseung Kwan O in 1992. For details of the planning history refer to Section 2.7.7 V 2.7.27 of the EIA Report). The TKO Interchange and Road P2 will affect an area zoned as OU and O in the south east corner of the TKO extension. Tiu Keng Leng Park is a planned open space over the depressed Road P2 in front of Ocean Shores and the park will extend onto the reclamation formed for the Road P2 landing. The TKO interchange will occupy an area of coast and Junk Bay zoned as OU and indicated on the OZP as allocated for Toll Plaza, Ventilation Building and Associated Facilities笥. Road P2 extends north to the junction of Po Yap Road where a new Civic Node will be developed with surrounding Open Space, G/IC and Residential development.

10.4.13      Following a series of public consultation/engagement activities from April 2009 to April 2012 (see Table 2.5 of the EIA Report), the comments and recommendations from the public on the Project including alignment selection, form of construction, land intake, environmental impact, traffic impact and engineering issues, as well as preservation of local culture and heritage, land-use planning and social impact were collected and considered for formulation of the recommended scheme. It is considered that the TKO-LT Tunnel is compatible with the current planning context in TKO and the transitional nature of the area requires that the visual impact analysis should take account of significant planned visually sensitive land-uses and receivers.

10.4.14      The relevant OZPs for the project works within the Kowloon side of the project are the Cha Kwo Ling, Yau Tong and Lei Yue Mun Outline Zoning Plan No S/K15/19, Kwun Tong South OZP No. S/K14S/17 and the Kai Tak OZP S/K22/4, extracts of which are shown in Figure No. 10.4.3. The land uses under these Plans affected by the Project Site footprint are zoned as G/IC, O, OU and GB and are summarised in Table 10.4.2.

Table 10.4.2

Cha Kwo Ling, Yau Tong and Lei Yue Mun Outline Zoning Plan No S/K15/19

Zoned Land Uses affected by the Project

Land Use Zoning

Area Affected

Sources of Impact/ Design Intent

Future Outlook

G/IC

Cha Kwo Ling Road and FEHD Vehicle Depot within old quarry

Road improvements and Lam Tin Interchange

Public road and Lam Tin Interchange comprising elevated slip roads within quarry footprint

R(A)4

West of former Cha Kwo Ling Kaolin Mine Site

Cha Kwo Ling Road improvements

High density residential with GIC facilities and Open Space provision

R(A)5

East of former Cha Kwo Ling Kaolin Mine Site & EHC

Road improvements

 

O

Abandoned Kaolin Mine Site east of Cha Kwo Ling (reserved for District Open Space)

Lam Tin Interchange

Public road and Lam Tin Interchange comprising elevated slip roads within quarry footprint

OU

Cross Harbour Tunnel Toll Plaza

Integration of Lam Tin Interchange with EHC and Cha Kwo Ling Road

Additional slip road connections

GB

Green belt surrounding ex Cha Kwo Ling Kaolin Mine Site and Sai Tso Wan Recreation Ground

Slope works and slip roads of Lam Tin Interchange

Slope works and slip roads of Lam Tin Interchange

 

10.4.15      The planning intent of the Lam Tin area is to redevelop Yau Tong to the east with new residential and commercial development, particularly within the Yau Tong Bay CDA. The Cha Kwo Ling village area facing the waterfront and the area behind is zoned as R(A)4 residential development and G/IC and the waterfront will be upgraded to provide public access and link into the Kai Tak Development to the north. The TKO-LT Tunnel therefore is compatible with the future development vision for the area in that it will enhance transport connections for the growing urban population in the adjacent development areas.

10.4.16      The project works footprint will fall primarily within the G/IC zoned land, and the existing FEHD Vehicle Depot and Seized Goods Compound, LCSD Nursery Site and the proposed LCSD Sports Complex/Indoor Recreation Centre cum District Open Space would be affected. Areas zoned as Open Space to the south and north east may be affected. Works related to public utilities are permitted within areas zoned as Open Space. The area of Open Space and Green Belt to the north of the quarry area would also be only temporarily impacted and the long term intent of providing a District Open Space would not be affected.

Hong Kong Island Side (north-eastern part)

10.4.17      A desk-top study has been undertaken of the current planning context of the waterfront portion along the northeast part of Hong Kong Island. With reference to the draft Chai Wan Outline Zoning Plan No. S/H20/20, it is noted that the current waterfront of Chai Wan and Siu Sai Wan are currently occupied by private residential developments, namely Heng Fa Chuen, Island Resort, Tai Koo Shing, Tung To Court, Tung Yuk Court and Aldrich Bay at Shau Kei Wan, Lei King Wan Grand Promenade and Les Saisons, all of which represent potential VSR groups for the TKO-LT Tunnel. There is no known planned new development or redevelopment along the waterfront portion within the study area that would result in any new VSR groups.

Tentative Programme

10.4.18      The TKO-LT Tunnel is to be implemented in parallel with the CBL. The works is tentatively scheduled to commence in February 2016 and be completed by November 2020. The project is anticipated to be commissioned in 2021.

Concurrent Projects

10.4.19      Concurrent projects have been identified below and are indicated on Figure No. 10.4.4.

TKO Side

P               Cross Bay Link (CBL);

P               TKO Town Centre South Development in Areas 65 and 66;

P               Cycle tracks and promenade developments around TKO Bay in Area 68;

P               TKO Area 86 Development;

P               Hong Kong Offshore Wind Farm in South Eastern Waters;

P               Residential Developments in Area 85;

P               G/IC developments in Area 78;

P               Planned recreational facilities at TKO Stage I Landfill, Area 77

Kowloon Side

P               Trunk Road T2

P               Kai Tak Development

P               Yau Tong Bay CDA development

P               Residential Development at ex-Cha Kwo Ling Kaolin Mine Site R(A) 4 zone

 

Description of Concurrent Projects - TKO Side

10.4.20      Cross Bay Link (CBL): the CBL is a designated project under the EIAO Ordinance and the EIA Study Brief No.ESB-195/2008 was issued by the Director of Environmental Protection on 26th August 2008 to CEDD for an EIA study. The CBL is a dual two-lane elevated carriageway of approximately 1.8km long, primarily on viaduct, running east-west across Junk Bay and connecting TKOVLT Tunnel to the Area 86 developments and Wan Po Road in south eastern TKO. There is a direct interface with the TKO-LT Tunnel in the west and the two projects will be implemented in parallel. The landscape and visual impacts of the CBL are assessed under a separate but related report under Agreement No. CE 43/2008 (HY).

10.4.21      TKO Town Centre South Development in Areas 65 and 66: this area is currently under construction. The area will be primarily residential and will generate VSRs in large numbers. It is anticipated phases of the development will be in operation between 2017 and 2018.

10.4.22      TKO Area 86 Comprehensive Development: the first phases of residential development have already been constructed at Area 86 and additional residential and educational developments are planned above the MTRCL depot. All these developments will generate potential VSRs and the TKO-LT Tunnel landing point, slip roads and tunnel portal will all be potentially visible. The comprehensive development is due for completion on or before 2019.

10.4.23      Cycle Tracks and Promenade Developments around TKO Bay in Area 68: a promenade and cycle tracks are proposed as part of the TKO Comprehensive Development. These will provide prime viewpoints for walkers and cyclists across Junk Bay from the edge of the reclamation (Area 68) across a proposed southern footbridge over Eastern Channel and around the edge of Area 77 which is a planned recreational facility proposed to be completed by Year 10 of the TKO-LT Tunnel. A footpath connecting Area 68 with the Junk Bay Chinese Permanent Cemetery will interface directly with the TKO-LT Tunnel at the tunnel portal area and at the landscaped deck in front of Ocean Shores. Walkers on this footpath will have direct views of the TKO tunnel portal and the TKO interchange and associated reclamation area. The Cycle Tracks and Promenade Developments are anticipated to be in operation on or before 2018.

10.4.24      Hong Kong Offshore Windfarm in Southeastern Waters: with reference to the Project Profile and EIA Study Brief (ESB V 146/2006) the project is to construct and operate a wind farm in the south eastern waters of Hong Kong. There is a proposed transmission cable landing point south of Ocean Shores which will connect cables from the offshore turbines to the CLP electricity grid. As the proposed works are minor and will consist of only a small underground cable connection pit these works are not considered further in this LVIA assessment.

10.4.25      Residential Areas in Area 85: two sites comprising 4ha are zoned for Group (E) Residential development. The planning intent is to phase out existing industrial uses in the area and develop it into a residential extension of the Area 86 CDA. Building heights up to 130m will be permitted. The construction of this residential development will likely be completed in 2013.

10.4.26      G/IC developments in Area 78: Sites at Pak Shing Kok have been reserved for a Fire Services Training School cum Driving Training School, a private hospital and other as yet undetermined G/IC uses. The site is largely screened by a large ridge to the west and building heights have been controlled so as not to exceed this. The G/IC developments are proposed to begin operation in 2017.

10.4.27      Planned Recreational Facilities at TKO Stage 1 Landfill Area 77: the total area of this site is 65.85ha and has been reserved for active and/or passive recreation and tourism/eco-tourism developments for the use of the general public and is anticipated to be completed by Year 10 of the TKO-LT Tunnel.

Description of Concurrent Projects - Kowloon Side

10.4.28      Trunk Road T2 (T2): T2 is a dual two-lane trunk road of about 3.6km long, 2.6km of which will be in tunnel. T2 will connect the CKR with the TKO-LT Tunnel and together they will form Route 6 in the strategic trunk road network. T2 and TKO-LT Tunnel will interface at the Lam Tin Interchange near Cha Kwo Ling Village and Laguna City.

10.4.29      Kai Tak Development: the development of the former airport site at Kai Tak affects an area of approximately 460ha and includes proposals for a variety of housing types, a tourism node, a Cruise Terminal, a multi-purpose stadium and a Metropolitan Park. The area is intended to house a population of some 260,000. Whilst the development is related to the Route 6 works there will be no direct interface with the TKO-LT Tunnel. VSRs in the new Kai Tak developments will not be aware of the Lam Tin Interchange due to the screening landform north of Cha Kwo Ling Village.

10.4.30      Yau Tong Bay CDA Development: the CDA zone in Yau Tong Bay is proposed to be comprehensively redeveloped for residential, commercial and community uses. A planning application has been submitted by a developer for waterfront housing with public promenade and open space. Should this be approved, the construction would be concurrent with the TKO-LT Tunnel. The development will create new residential VSRs along Cha Kwo Ling Road but screen out existing VSRs to the south east.

10.4.31      The Ex- Cha Kwo Ling Kaolin Mine Site: the site is proposed to be developed for residential use, G/IC facilities and public open space. A planning study is being conducted but no planning application has been submitted for the proposed development to date. If a planning application is submitted and approved, it is likely that the development would be completed during the construction of the TKO-LT Tunnel between 2016 and 2019. The new development would create additional VSRs overlooking the Lam Tin Interchange.


10.5                Baseline Study

Physical Landscape Resources and Landscape Character Areas

10.5.1          The study area on the TKO side lies within the existing urban area of Po Yap Road and on the flat reclaimed land of the TKO extension in the north, on the western hill slopes of the Tiu Keng Leng hills to the south west and the seawater body of Junk Bay to the south east. Landscape resources include amenity tree planting in the urban areas, amenity tree planting on roadsides and modified slopes, self -seeded vegetation on the reclamation, grassland/shrubland vegetation on the coastal hill slopes, ponds and streams, the natural rocky and sandy shoreline and the open water expanse of west Junk Bay.

10.5.2          The baseline Landscape Resources for TKO that will be affected during the Construction and Operation Phases and their sensitivity are described below in Table 10.5.1. An overall view of Baseline Landscape Resources - TKO and Lam Tin is illustrated on Figure 10.5.1.1. The locations of the TKO Baseline Landscape Resources are illustrated at a larger scale on Figures 10.5.1.1a - 1b. Photographic Views illustrating the Landscape Resources are provided on Figure 10.5.1.2.

Table 10.5.1 V Tseung Kwan O Landscape Resources and their Sensitivity

ID No.

TKO Landscape Resource

Sensitivity

TKO-LR1

Junk Bay (Tseung Kwan O) Sea Waterbody

 

The sea waterbody comprises part of Junk Bay and is a valuable landscape resource contributing to the unique waterfront setting of TKO. The approximate area within the study boundary is 114 ha.

 

The sensitivity is assessed as High given the channel绞s physical characteristics and the statutory presumption against reclamation.

High

TKO-LR2

Natural Rocky Shore along Chiu Keng Wan Coastline

 

This rocky shore forms part of the last stretch of natural coastline in Junk Bay (apart from Fat Tong Chau on the eastern side) and measures approximately 1102m.

The sensitivity of the natural coastline is High due to its relative rarity within the locality (due to the high proportion of reclamation coast within Junk Bay), its distinctive character and low tolerance of change (it cannot be replaced).

High

TKO-LR3A

Amenity/ Roadside Planting/ Vegetation on modified slopes at Chiu Keng Wan Shan

 

The vegetation on the natural hillsides of Chiu Keng Wan Shan consists of planting on engineered slopes. In general, the vegetation is dominated by exotic tree species typically planted throughout Hong Kong including Acacia confusa, Acacia auriculiformis, Eucalyptus spp., Casuarina equisetifolia and with occasional native tree species such as Celtis sinensis, Macaranga tanarius and Schefflera heptaphylla. Representative shrubs recorded include Rhodomyrtus tomentosa, Lantana camara and Rhaphiolepis indica and grasses recorded include Hedyotis acutangula and Neyraudia reynaudiana. No plant species of conservation interest were recorded within these areas.

 

The sensitivity of the vegetation is assessed as Medium as it is generally semi-mature secondary woodland or roadside planting and a relatively common local resource that can easily be reinstated and is therefore reasonably tolerant of change.

Medium

TKO- LR3B

Vegetation on modified slopes at Tiu Keng Leng

 

The vegetation on the natural hillsides of Tiu Keng Leng and Mau Wu Shan consists of planting on engineered slopes. In general, the vegetation is dominated by exotic tree species typically planted throughout Hong Kong including Acacia confusa, Acacia auriculiformis, Eucalyptus spp., Casuarina equisetifolia and with occasional native tree species such as Celtis sinensis, Macaranga tanarius and Schefflera heptaphylla. Representative shrubs recorded include Rhodomyrtus tomentosa, Lantana camara and Rhaphiolepis indica and grasses recorded include Hedyotis acutangula and Neyraudia reynaudiana. No plant species of conservation interest were recorded within these areas.

 

The sensitivity of the vegetation is assessed as Medium as it is generally semi-mature secondary woodland or roadside planting and a relatively common local resource that can easily be reinstated and is therefore reasonably tolerant of change.

Medium

TKO- LR3C

Amenity/ Roadside Planting on modified slopes at Junk Bay Chinese Permanent Cemetery

 

The amenity planting/ vegetation on the natural hillsides southeast of Chiu Keng Wan Shan and at Junk Bay Chinese Permanent Cemetery consists of planting on engineered slopes. In general, the composition is dominated by exotic tree species typically planted throughout Hong Kong including Acacia confusa, Acacia auricuioformis, Eucalyptus spp., Casuarina equisetifolia and with occasional native tree species such as Celtis sinensis, Macaranga tanarius and Schefflera heptaphylla. No plant species of conservation interest were recorded within these areas.

 

The sensitivity of the vegetation is assessed as Medium as it is generally semi-mature secondary woodland or roadside planting and a relatively common local resource that can easily be reinstated and is therefore reasonably tolerant of change.

Medium

TKO- LR3D

Amenity /Roadside Planting on modified slopes along Road D4 (Po Yap Road and Chui Ling Road) and P2 (Po Shun Road)

 

The Amenity / Roadside planting on modified slopes and at grade along Po Yap Road and the northern edge of the TKO reclamation consists of common roadside tree species including Bauhinia blakeana and Hibiscus tiliaceus. Representative shrubs recorded include Rhodomyrtus tomentosa, Lantana camara and Rhaphiolepis indica and grasses recorded include Hedyotis acutangla and Neyraudia reynaudiana.

 

The sensitivity of the vegetation is assessed as Medium as it is generally semi-mature roadside planting and a relatively common local resource that can easily be reinstated and is therefore reasonably tolerant of change.

Medium

TKO-LR4

Mixed Woodland Vegetation on hillside areas at Chiu Keng Wan Shan

 

The mixed woodland habitat covers an area of 2.8ha south of the residential blocks of Ocean Shores. This resource is dominated by common and widespread native pioneer tree species (Macaranga tanarius, Mallotus paniculatus, Sapium discolour, Ficus hispida and Schefflera heptaphylla). Other common species include trees (Celtis sinensis and Araucaria heterophylla), various fruit tree species, climbers (Dalbergia benthamii) and shrubs (Manihot esculenta and Phyllanthus cochinchinensis). No rare flora or species of conservation interest were recorded during recent surveys.

 

The sensitivity of the Cemetery tree planting is Medium as it comprises common species that can easily be reinstated and is therefore reasonably able to accommodate change.

Medium

TKO-LR5A

Grassland/Shrubland Mosaic at Chiu Keng Wan Shan

 

Grassland/Shrubland Mosaic covers an approximate area of 63ha. This resource covers most of Chiu Keng Wan Shan and the back-shore slope along the coast of Chiu Keng Wan. Representative vegetation recorded includes young pioneer trees (Macaranga tanarius, Litsea glutinosa and Bridelia tomentosa), shrubs (Rhodomyrtus tomentosa, Lantana camara and Rhaphiolepis indica) and grasses (Hedyotis acutangula and Neyraudia reynaudiana).

 

This resource is assessed as having Medium sensitivity given its common species composition and secondary nature, and the large expanses of similar vegetation stretching to the north and east. It could be reinstated if impacted and is therefore reasonable able to accommodate change.

Medium

TKO-LR5B

Grassland/ shrubland mosaic at Tiu Keng Leng

 

Grassland/ shrubland mosaic covers an approximate area of 29ha. This resource covers the upper slopes of Tiu Keng Leng. Representative vegetation recorded within grassland/ shrubland mosaic habitat includes young pioneer trees (Macaranga tanarius, Litsea glutinosa and Bridelia tomentose), shrubs (Rhodomyrtus tomentosa, Lantana camara and Rhaphiolepis indica) and grasses (Hedyotis acutangula and Neyraudia reynaudiana).

 

This resource is assessed as having Medium sensitivity given its common species composition and secondary nature. It could be reinstated if impacted and is therefore reasonable able to accommodate change.

Medium

TKO-LR6A

Ponds at Junk Bay Chinese Permanent Cemetery and Chiu Keng Wan Shan

 

Several concrete water retention ponds were recorded within the TKO Chinese Permanent Cemetery. These ponds serve as a flood prevention measure to store the surface runoff from the Cemetery. They are surrounded by plantation habitat. They have a total area of approximately 0.24ha.

 

Given their artificial character this resource is assessed as having a Medium sensitivity.

Medium

TKO-LR6B

Streams at Junk Bay Chinese Permanent Cemetery and Chiu Keng Wan Shan

 

Three natural streams (identified on plan as Streams 2, 3 and 4) with a total length of approximately 750m run down the western coast of Chiu Keng Wan. These rocky streams are intermittent in nature depending on season and discharge into Junk Bay.

 

Given their natural character, that they are few in number within the study area and the fact that they cannot be easily recreated, these resources are assessed as having a High sensitivity.

High

TKO-LR7

Village Trees within Chiu Keng Wan Shan

 

This resource is located at the slope below the TKO Chinese Permanent Cemetery and covers an area of 2ha. It comprises scattered orchard planting within village housing areas. The species include Dimocarpus longan, Antirhea chinensis and Schefflera heptaphylla.

 

This resource is assessed as having a High sensitivity as the trees contribute to local amenity (although none are rare, endangered species or registered OVTs and they could be reinstated should they be impacted).

High

TKO-LR8

Sandy Shore along Chiu Keng Wan Shan Coastline

 

On the western coast of Junk Bay, natural sandy shore occurs in 3 small bays within the study area and these have a combined length of approximately 437 m.

 

The sensitivity of the natural sandy shore is High due to its relative rarity within the locality (due to the high proportion of reclamation coast within Junk Bay), its distinctive character and low tolerance of change (it cannot be easily replaced).

High

TKO-LR9

Self-seeded Vegetation on TKO Reclamation

 

This includes self-seeded trees, shrubs and grasses on the new reclamation area forming the southern extension of TKO. Most are common native species and are in poor condition having received no formal maintenance. Dominant tree species include Acacia spp., Albizia spp., Bauhinia blakeana, Cassia siamea, Eucalyptus spp., Hibiscus tiliaceus, Leucaena leucocephala. The reclamation occupies an area of approximately 9.7ha of which the vegetation only covers limited areas which are subject to change due to on-going building works.

 

The sensitivity of this vegetation is considered as Low as it is predominantly incidental, of common species and of low quality.

Low

 

10.5.3          The baseline Landscape Character Areas for TKO that will be affected during the Construction and Operation Phases and their sensitivity are described below in Table 10.5.2. The locations of the Baseline Landscape Character Areas for TKO are illustrated on Figure No. 10.5.2.1. Photographic Views illustrating the Landscape Character Areas are provided on Figure No 10.5.2.2.

Table 10.5.2 V Tseung Kwan O Landscape Character Areas and their Sensitivity

ID No.

TKO Landscape Character Area

Sensitivity

TKO-LCA1

Junk Bay Inshore Water Landscape

 

This includes the open water of Junk Bay and its interface with the natural and reclaimed coastline. Junk Bay provides a dramatic contrast to the surrounding ridges and hills and creates the unique waterside setting for TKO. The western portion is delimited by natural coastline and the northern edge by reclamation which offers the potential for an enhanced waterfront environment and access. Junk Bay is not only of value to TKO but also to viewers from the south on Hong Kong Island, seaborne viewers and viewers on elevated ground to the west, north and east.

 

Given the role this LCA plays in setting the bay side context of TKO, and the fact that its characteristic is flat and open, the sensitivity is assessed as High.

High

 

TKO-LCA2

Junk Bay Chinese Permanent Cemetery Landscape

 

This is a highly distinctive landscape character area comprising a concrete terraced hillside housing graves and shrines and a central columbarium. There are some groups of mature trees around the columbarium and small trees and shrubs along the terraces but overall the cemetery has a stark, hard aspect contrasting dramatically with the natural vegetation of the adjacent hills. Cemetery landscape is common on the urban fringe throughout Hong Kong.

 

As the cemetery landscape is a common resource, of no particular visual or landscape quality and has a high tolerance to change, the sensitivity is assessed as Medium.

Medium

TKO-LCA3

Chiu Keng Wan Coastal Upland and Hillside Landscape

 

This landscape area covers the steep natural terrain on the western side of Junk Bay. It is designated Green Belt and forms a buffer to the urban area of TKO to the north. The area is largely undeveloped with a road and footpaths forming the only manmade elements. It is mostly covered in secondary woodland comprising trees, shrubs and grasses. This semi-natural landscape acts as a foil to the hard man-made forms of the residential high-rise to the north and the cemetery terraces to the south.

 

Given that this character area is a remnant of the original Junk Bay landscape, that there is a statutory presumption against development and it provides a green backdrop to the dense built up area of TKO, it is assessed as having a High sensitivity.

High

TKO-LCA4

Mixed Modern Comprehensive Urban Development Landscape

 

This character area consists of the existing urban area of TKO which comprises a mix of relatively recent Government, commercial, community and residential developments and transport corridors. The scale of the developments is large with multi-storey developments and the population density is high.

 

This landscape character area is assessed as having a Medium sensitivity as it is a common urban character type throughout Hong Kong and has no particular distinctive qualities. Given its context next to the TKO reclamation to the south which is in a continuing state of transition it has a reasonable tolerance to change.

Medium

TKO-LCA5

Reclamation/Ongoing Major Development Landscape at proposed Tseung Kwan O Town Centre south

 

The reclamation is a transitional landscape which is currently largely an area of earthworks, hoardings and fences, groups of self-seeded vegetation and mechanical plant. There is a temporary golf driving range in the eastern portion. The infrastructure for the new TKO Town Centre South Development is currently being installed.

 

Given the transitional nature of this character area and the planning intention to develop it into a new town extension, this area is assessed as having a Low sensitivity.

Low

TKO-LCA6

Urban Residential Landscape

 

This area is characterised by high rise residential developments with podiums served by commercial and institutional facilities and road connections. The margins of the area are well defined by transport corridors and podium edges. The built form is typical of Hong Kong housing estates and has no particular landscape character value.

 

The sensitivity of this character area is assessed as Medium given its proximity to the ongoing TKO Town Centre South Development to the east.

Medium

TKO-LCA7

Mau Wu Shan Upland and Hillside Landscape

 

This landscape area covers the southern slopes of the hills behind TKO. It is designated Green Belt and forms a buffer to the urban area of TKO to the south. The area consists of a combination of artificial slopes at the lower level and natural landform above. The artificial slopes are sparsely vegetated but the natural slopes have dense woodland coverage.

 

Given that this character has already been impacted by slope works and is of semi-natural quality, it has a Medium sensitivity.

Medium

 

10.5.4          The study area within the Lam Tin side of the project area is flanked by Victoria Harbour and the Lei Yue Mun Channel to the west and the Black Hill (Ng Kwai Shan) ridgeline to the east. The Cha Kwo Ling ridge is the site of old granite and kaolin quarry workings and supports areas of mature woodland and sparse scrub. The northern part of the workings now incorporates Sai Tso Wan Recreational Ground. The main quarry site is currently utilised for vehicular storage. Cha Kwo Ling Village lies to the west of the ridge facing the waterfront and comprises old, low-rise development including the historic Tin Hau Temple. The Eastern Harbour Crossing Tunnel approaches and toll plaza cut through the centre of the study area and has associated peripheral tree planting. The urban area to the east contains new residential, educational and park facilities incorporating amenity planting. The Yau Tong Bay waterfront is currently derelict and is scheduled for comprehensive redevelopment. The Lei Yue Mun Channel is the narrowest point of Victoria Harbour and is a busy sea lane used by shipping, ferries, fishing boats and pleasure craft. The open channel also affords panoramic views of the Hong Kong Island skyline. Landscape Resources include amenity trees along roadsides and modified slopes, mixed woodland, ponds and natural watercourses, amenity grassland, natural grass and shrub areas and the Lei Yue Mun Channel sea waterbody.

10.5.5          The baseline Landscape Resources at Lam Tin that will be affected during the Construction and Operation Phases and their sensitivity are described below in Table 10.5.3. An overall view of Baseline Landscape Resources - TKO and Lam Tin is illustrated on Figure 10.5.1.1. The locations of the Baseline Landscape Resources at Lam Tin are illustrated on Figure No.s 10.5.3.1a- 1b. Photographic Views illustrating the Landscape Resources at Lam Tin are provided on Figure 10.5.3.2.

 

Table 10.5.3 V Lam Tin Landscape Resources and their Sensitivity

ID No.

Lam Tin Landscape Resources

Sensitivity (Low, Medium, High)

LT-LR1

Lei Yue Mun Channel Sea Waterbody

 

The Lei Yue Mun Channel is the narrowest point of Hong Kong Harbour and is a busy sea lane for ocean going ships, fishing boats, pleasure craft and sampans. There is a presumption against reclamation of the harbour under the Protection of the Harbour Ordinance. This is particularly pertinent at Lei Yue Mun given the narrowness of the channel. The channel marks the gateway to Hong Kong Harbour and has played a significant role in the cultural history of the city. The area within the study boundary is approximately 68 ha.

 

The sensitivity is assessed as High given the water body绞s physical characteristics, cultural history value and the statutory presumption against reclamation.

High

LT-LR2

Trees within Yau Tong Bay Industrial Waterfront Area

 

There are approximately 125 no. existing trees in the derelict industrial waterfront strip of Yau Tong Bay (Kwun Tong Tsai Wan). These are mostly common self-seeded species that have established on vacant and derelict sites and are generally of low value. Dominant tree species include Albizia lebbek, Acacia spp., Macaranga tanarius, Hibiscus tiliaceus, Leucaena leucocephala.

 

The sensitivity is assessed as Medium given the poor quality of the trees and their general low amenity value and that they could be replaced.

Medium

LT- LR3

Mixed Woodland Vegetation on Hillside Areas

 

There is approximately 10 ha of hillside vegetation comprising trees, shrubs, grass and climbers on the natural slopes to the north east fringe of the Lam Tin urban area. It comprises secondary woodland and dominant tree species include Acacia spp., Casuarina equisetifolia, Celtis sinensis, Ficus spp., Leucaena leucocephala and Macaranga tanarius. Part of this area is designated Greenbelt, G/IC uses and Residential (Group A). The vegetation provides a valuable green buffer and backdrop to this dense urban area and begins the transition to the natural uplands of the Black Hill (Ng Kwai Shan) ridge.

 

This resource is assessed as having Medium sensitivity given its common species composition, secondary nature, urban fringe context and the large expanses of similar vegetation stretching to the north and east.

Medium

LT- LR4

Pond at Cha Kwo Ling

 

A seasonal pond is located in the abandoned quarry site north east of Cha Kwo Ling Tsuen. The pond covers approximately 0.16ha and accommodates a variety of low, water loving vegetation.

 

Due to its transitory nature and low ecological value, this resource is assessed as having a Medium sensitivity.

Medium

LT- LR5

Natural Watercourse

 

A branching natural stream flows down the vegetated slopes between Ping Tin and Kwong Tin Estates. It is an uncommon resource in an urban area and provides a wildlife habitat. The stream lies within an area zoned for G/IC and Residential land uses. The length of the watercourse is approximately 600m.

 

Given its natural character and relative rarity within this urban area, the stream is assessed as having High sensitivity.

High

LT- LR6

Grass Sports Pitch within Sai Tso Wan Recreation Ground

 

The sports pitch provides a valuable recreational resource within a dense urban area and occupies an area of approximately 1.53 ha.

 

As this resource comprises turf of common commercially available grass species which is easily reinstated, the sensitivity for this recreational resource is assessed as Low.

Low

LT- LR7

Village Trees within Cha Kwo Ling Residential Area

 

A number of mature trees lie within the low rise Cha Kwo Ling Village. Dominant tree species include Acacia spp., Eucalyptus spp., Ficus spp., Litsea glutinosa, Mallotus paniculatus, Sterculia lanceolata. The existing trees and shrubs occupy an approximate area of 1ha.

 

This resource is assessed as having a High sensitivity as the trees are mature and contribute to local amenity.

High

LT-LR8A

Amenity/Roadside Planting/Vegetation on Modified Slopes at Sai Tso Wan

 

Within the assessment area there is a network of amenity planting along roads and on modified slopes which support a wide variety of flora. There are significant quantities of semi mature and mature tree species situated in these areas including on quarry and other modified slopes, in recreational facilities, temporary and permanent depots. This vegetation comprises common ornamental tree, shrub and climber species and native pioneer tree species including: Acacia spp., Bauhinia spp. Bischofia jananica, Bombax ceiba, Casuarina equisetifolia, Celtis sinensis, Cinnamomum camphora, Eucalyptus spp., Ficus spp., Hibiscus tiliaceus, Leucaena leucocephala, Litsea glutinosa, Macaranga tanarius, Melia azadarach, Schefflera heptaphylla, Sterculia lanceolata, Syzygium jambos.

 

The sensitivity of this resource is assessed as High due the maturity of the vegetation and the greening and amenity value it provides throughout the assessment area.

High

LT-LR8B

Amenity/Roadside Planting/Vegetation on Modified Slopes at Former Quarry

 

This resource is similar in composition to LT/LR8A but occupies a distinct and significant location (in terms of the project footprint) on the rock walls and surrounding slopes of the former quarry site. The area of vegetation is approximately 5.08ha.

 

The sensitivity of this resource is assessed as High due the mature nature of the vegetation and the greening value it provides for the quarry.

High

LT-LR9A

Grassland/Shrubland Mosaic on Ng Kwai Shan

 

Grassland/shrubland mosaic areas are located at Ng Kwai Shan on undulating or sloping terrain. Vegetation recorded includes pioneer tree species such as Macaranga tanarius, Litsea glutinosa and Bridelia tomentosa, shrubs such as Rhodomyrtus tomentosa, Lantana camara and Rhaphiolepis indica, ferns Dicranopteris pedata, grasses Hedyotis acutangula and Neyraudia reynaudiana and herbs Bidens alba and Ageratum conyzoides.

 

This resource is assessed as having Medium sensitivity given its common species composition.

Medium

LT-LR9B

Grassland/Shrubland Mosaic at Cha Kwo Ling

Grassland/shrubland mosaic areas are located at Cha Kwo Ling on undulating or sloping terrain. Vegetation recorded within grassland/shrubland mosaic includes pioneer tree species such as Macaranga tanarius, Litsea glutinosa and Bridelia tomentosa, shrubs Rhodomyrtus tomentosa, Lantana camara and Rhaphiolepis indica, ferns Dicranopteris pedata, grasses Hedyotis acutangula and Neyraudia reynaudiana and herbs Bidens alba and Ageratum conyzoides.

 

This resource is assessed as having Medium sensitivity given its common species composition.

Medium

 

10.5.6          The baseline Landscape Character Areas at Lam Tin that will be affected during the Construction and Operation Phases and their sensitivity are described below in Table 10.5.4. The locations of the Baseline Landscape Character Areas at Lam Tin are illustrated on Figure No. 10.5.4.1. Photographic Views illustrating the Landscape Character Areas at Lam Tin are provided on Figure 10.5.4.2.

 

 

Table 10.5.4 V Lam Tin Landscape Character Areas and their Sensitivity

ID No.

Lam Tin Landscape Character Areas

Sensitivity (Low, Medium, High)

LT-LCA1

Lei Yue Mun Channel Inshore Water Landscape

 

The Lei Yue Mun Channel is the narrowest point of Hong Kong Harbour and is a busy sea lane for ocean going ships, fishing boats, pleasure craft and sampans. The proximity of the shorelines either side of the channel at this point provide a unique sense of enclosure and intimacy in the harbour. The channel marks the gateway to Hong Kong Harbour and has played a significant role in the rich history of the development of the harbour city.

 

The sensitivity is assessed as High given the channel绞s physical characteristics, unique local sense of scale, the cultural history and the statutory presumption against reclamation.

High

LT-LCA2

Yau Tong Bay Coastal Industrial Urban Landscape

 

This is a waterfront strip of derelict and downgraded industrial uses. It is now predominantly zoned as a CDA with the intention of redevelopment into residential and commercial waterfront to revitalise the area. The waterfront extension in front of Cha Kwo Ling Village is zoned as Open Space, G/IC and Other Uses and the planning vision is to connect the upgraded waterfront with that of the Kai Tak redevelopment to the north. The existing visual character is poor and there are no landscape features of intrinsic value apart from some existing trees. It is the waterfront context that imparts the character to this zone.

 

The sensitivity of this landscape character area is assessed as Low given the current derelict condition and the planning intent to redevelop it.

Low

LT-LCA3

Lam Tin Upland and Hillside Landscape

 

The green vegetated slopes within and behind Yau Tong provide an organic backdrop which acts as a visual foil to the dense urban development. It also marks the urban fringe transition to the undeveloped natural upland landscapes above and is generally zoned for Residential and G/IC uses although part of its area is zoned as Greenbelt.

 

The sensitivity of this character area is assessed as Medium as it lies within the urban fringe zone and is juxtaposed with dense urban development and is reasonably tolerant to change.

Medium

LT- LCA4

Miscellaneous Urban Fringe Landscape

 

This distinctive character area comprises Cha Kwo Ling Village and lies between Cha Kwo Ling Road and the waterfront strip to the south west and the elevated ridge of land of the former quarry site to the north east. The village comprises an organic patchwork of low rise dwellings with sporadic tree planting.

 

This area is assessed as being of Medium sensitivity due to its organic nature and it location adjacent to the transitional waterfront area (LCA2) to the southwest, and it is reasonably tolerant to change.

Medium

LT-LCA5

Urban Recreational Landscape

 

This character area is focused around the Sai Tso Wan Recreation Ground and Sin Fat Road Tennis Courts immediately north of the quarry site. The recreational facilities lie within a broad swathe of mature woodland which screens adjacent LCAs and provides a strong sense of enclosure for the facilities.

 

This area is reasonably tolerant to change due to the dense woodland screen which could be reinstated and is therefore assessed as having a Medium sensitivity.

Medium

LT-LCA6

Urban Transport Corridor

 

A broad, linear zone stretching from the Cha Kwo Ling Road and The Eastern Harbour Crossing in the south west to Lei Yue Mun Road in the north west is characterised by carriageways, slip roads, toll plazas, traffic islands, foot bridges and overpasses, roadside slopes and retaining structures.

 

Due to the low visual quality of this area and as it is largely tolerant to change the sensitivity is assessed as Low.

Low

LT-LCA7

Lam Tin Residential Urban Landscape

 

This character area forms the main urban landscape of the study area and comprises modern high rise residential developments and associated pockets of associated facilities such as commercial and educational establishments, punctuated in places with amenity planting. The urban character is unremarkable and similar to most of Hong Kong绞s urban residential character.

 

As the landscape quality of this area is unremarkable and as it is reasonably tolerant to change the sensitivity is assessed as Medium.

Medium

LT-LCA8

Former Quarry Landscape V Abandoned

 

This landscape character area comprises the north west portion of the abandoned Ex-Cha Kwo Ling Quarry Site. It consists of uneven ground with modified slopes and rock-cut platforms. Some slopes and areas of ground are bare and devoid of vegetation cover. Most of the area supports a patchy mosaic of trees, shrubs and grass which are self-seeded and in various stages of maturity. The area is abandoned except for a level platform on the northern side with associated access road which is currently utilised as a storage facility.

 

This landscape character area is assessed as having Low sensitivity due to its abandoned state and incidental vegetation coverage and is considered to be tolerant to change.

Low

LT-LCA9

Former Quarry Landscape V Occupied

 

This southern portion of the Ex-Cha Kwo Ling Quarry Site is defined by steep rock cut walls with benches which enclose a flat central portion which has been actively used as an FEHD storage facility (Cha Kwo Ling Vehicle Depot) and formerly a nursery area. The surrounding slopes and rock-cut benches are covered with a combination of self-seeded and planted tree, shrub and climber vegetation which reinforces the sense of enclosure of the area and provides a degree of visual amenity.

 

Whilst this landscape character area has a large number of existing mature trees, a significant proportion (approximately 40%) of the area is access road or hardstanding and the land uses that it supports are transient in nature. Overall, the sensitivity is therefore assessed as Medium as it is reasonably able to tolerate change.

Medium

Tree Survey Data

10.5.7          A detailed tree survey has been undertaken within the anticipated footprint of the engineering alignment and works areas. The survey was undertaken in accordance with ETWB-TC No.3/2006 and includes Tree Survey Plans recording all trees with a stem diameter over 95mm DBH (diameter at breast height or 1.3m above ground level). The Tree Preservation Report has been circulated to relevant government departments.

10.5.8          On the TKO side of the tunnel the tree survey was undertaken for 2 distinct areas. For Area A笥 of the tree survey, including roads P2 and D4 on the edge of the existing TKO urban area and some of the recent reclamation to the south a total of 327 no. existing trees comprising 19 no. species were surveyed. No rare or endangered species and no Old and Valuable Trees笥 (OVTs) as defined under ETWB TC(W) 29/2004 or listed in the LCSD OVT Register were identified within the survey area. There were also no potential OVTs or Important Trees笥 (ITs) as defined by ETWB TC(W) 3/2006. The dominant species surveyed were Acacia confusa, Bauhinia blakeana, Hibiscus tiliaceus, Cassia siamea and Eucalyptus camaldulensis and together these comprise over 72% of the trees. Acacia confusa, Cassia siamea and Eucalyptus camuldensis are exotic species whereas Bauhinia blakeana and Hibiscus tiliaceus are native to Hong Kong. All the trees are in roadside environments and have been planted relatively recently (within approximately the last 5 to 10 years). As the trees are predominantly common species and are not yet mature, their Amenity Value is rated Medium to Low. Existing trees impacted along Po Yap Road will be compensated at a ratio of 1:1 by number and girth (provisionally 26 no. heavy standard compensatory trees will be planted along roadsides). All 30 of the trees proposed to be transplanted will be transplanted to permanent sites within the project site.

10.5.9          Tree survey Area B笥 is on the TKO side of the tunnel and includes the tunnel portal area. A total of 191 no. existing live trees comprising 13 no. species were surveyed. No rare or endangered species and no Old and Valuable Trees笥 (OVTs) and no potential OVTs or Important Trees笥 (ITs) were identified. The dominant species surveyed were Acacia auriculiformis, Acacia confusa, Acacia mangium, Acronychia pedunculata, Sapium discolor and Schefflera heptaphylla and together these 6 species comprise 93% of the trees. All the species are exotic except for Acronychia pedunculata and Sapium discolor which are native to Hong Kong suggesting that this area is secondary woodland that was planted rather than natural indigenous vegetation cover. Approximately 50 trees on slopes surrounding the TKO tunnel portal will be impacted. Tree planting or woodland mix planting is not feasible on the new tunnel portal slopes but they will be 胙greened绞 with shrub and climber planting to reduce the visual impact. The trees removed within Area B will be compensated at a ratio of 1:1 by number and girth along the reclaimed Road P2 within the project site.

10.5.10      Tree survey Area C笥 on the Lam Tin side of the tunnel, includes the Link Road EHC2 and the realignment of the slip road from Lei Yue Mun Road onto the westbound carriageway of the EHC. A total of 132 no. trees comprising 22 no. species were individually surveyed. No rare or endangered species and no Old and Valuable Trees笥 (OVTs) and no potential OVTs or Important Trees笥 (ITs) were identified. The dominant species surveyed were Acacia auriculiformis, Acacia confusa, Bauhinia blakeana, Caryota mitis, Ficus benjamina, and Melaleuca quinquenervia and together these comprise over 67% of the trees. All the species are exotic except for Bauhinia blakeana which is native to Hong Kong. The trees include roadside/street tree planting and trees planted within and around the former Cha Kwo Ling Kaolin Mine Site. Existing trees impacted along Link Road EH2 and along the slip road from Lei Yue Mun Road to the westbound carriageway of the EHC will be  compensated at a ratio of 1:1 by number and girth (provisionally 23 no. heavy standard compensatory trees will be planted along roadsides).

10.5.11      On the Lam Tin side of the tunnel, tree survey Area D笥 includes the area of the Lam Tin tunnel portal and associated ventilation building on the north east and western walls of the Ex-Cha Kwo Ling Kaolin Mine Site; the proposed Lam Tin Interchange comprising the main highway and slip roads in the Ex-Cha Kwo Ling Kaolin Mine Site, associated buildings of the TKO-LTT including administration block, a vehicle garage, a Pumping Station and maintenance facilities including a workshop, training ground, vehicle garage, a vehicle recovery base and petrol station; road improvements along Cha Kwo Ling Road and at the junction of Yau Tong Road and at the Roundabout. A total of 3,152 trees were surveyed individually or under the group survey method comprising 61 different species. No rare or endangered species and no Old and Valuable Trees笥 (OVTs) and no potential OVTs or Important Trees笥 (ITs) were identified. The dominant species surveyed were Acacia confusa, Casuarina equisetifolia, Eucalyptus exserta, Ficus hispida, Leucaena leucocephala, Macaranga tanarius and Mallotus paniculatus and together these comprise over 80% of the trees. Acacia confusa, Casuarina equisetifolia, Eucalyptus exserta, Ficus hispida and Leucaena leucocephala are exotic species whereas Macaranga tanarius and Mallotus paniculatus are native to Hong Kong. The trees surveyed under the group survey lie on slopes and uneven ground on the former Cha Kwo Ling Kaolin mine site and were either planted following cessation of mine workings or have self-seeded since that date. Existing trees impacted within the ex-Cha Kwo Ling Quarry Site will be compensated a ratio of 1:1 by number and girth. Provisionally approximately 700 no. heavy standard compensatory trees will be planted in and around the Lam Tin Interchange. In addition, some slopes will be planted with woodland whip mix planting that will ultimately develop into woodland.

10.5.12      Drawings extracted from Tree Preservation Report include the Tree Survey Plans (Drawing No.s URB/MCA75/TA000-003, 101-103, 201, 203-212 and 301) and the Preliminary Compensatory Planting Plans (Drawing No.s URB/MCA75/CP-101, 201, 203, 301, 403-408) of the tree survey Areas A to D are attached in Appendix 10.1.

Visual Envelope

10.5.13      The visual envelope of the project is illustrated on Figure No. 10.4.1. The two geographically separate areas of the project at TKO and Lam Tin generate two distinct visual envelopes or ZVIs. The ZVIs overlap in their southern portions. VSRs for the two areas are identified and tabulated separately for clarity.

10.5.14      The ZVI for the TKO side of the project is bounded by Shau Kei Wan, Lei Yue Mun and the ridgeline of the hills enclosing Junk Bay to the west, the urban area of TKO to the north, the ridgeline of Clearwater Bay Country Park to the east, the Tathong Channel to the south west and the ridgeline of the hills of Hong Kong Island in the Tai Tam Country Park in the south west. The ZVI adopts a cut-off at the Tathong Channel as the only potential VSRs beyond this would be on Sung Kong and Waglan Island from which visual impacts would be negligible due to their distant location.

10.5.15      The ZVI for the Lam Tin side of the project is bounded by the ridgelines of Hong Kong Island to the south and south west, the wooded ridge behind Cha Kwo Ling Village, the quarry walls and the proposed residential developments at the Ex-Cha Kwo Ling Kaolin Mine Site to the west and north and the urban area of Yau Tong to the east and south east.

Visually Sensitive Receivers (VSRs)

10.5.16      Key Visually Sensitive Receivers (VSRs) have been identified for the Construction and Operation phases. For ease of reference, each VSR is given an identity number, which is used in the text tables and Drawings in this assessment. The VSRs for TKO and Lam Tin are tabulated separately. They are listed and assessed below, for their sensitivity to change in view as a result of the Project in Tables 10.6.5 and 10.5.7. They are listed and assessed below for the magnitude of change in view in Tables 10.5.6 and 10.5.8.

10.5.17      VSRs for TKO during the Construction Phase are mapped on Figure No.s 10.5.5.1 to 10.5.5.3, namely Baseline VSRs during Construction - TKO (Sheets 1 to 3) and VSRs for TKO during the Operation Phase are mapped on Figure No.s 10.5.5.4 to 10.5.5.6 namely Baseline VSRs during Operation - TKO (Sheets 1 to 3) Baseline VSR Photographs with views to or from the VSRs at TKO are shown on Figure No.s 10.5.5.7 to 10.5.5.19 (Sheets 1 to 13).

10.5.18      VSRs for Lam Tin during the Construction Phase are mapped on Figure No.s 10.5.6.1 and 10.5.6.2, namely Baseline VSRs during Construction V Lam Tin (Sheets 1 to 2) and VSRs for Lam Tin during the Operation Phase are mapped on Figure No.s 10.5.6.3 and 10.5.6.4, namely Baseline VSRs during Operation V Lam Tin (Sheets 1 to 2). Baseline VSR Photographs with views to or from the VSRs at Lam Tin are shown on Figure No.s 10.5.6.5 to 10.5.6.15. (Sheets 1 to 12).

10.5.19      Certain VSRs which lie outside the ZVI have also been included in the assessment, particularly for the Lam Tin side of the project. These VSRs due to their location and proximity have the potential for views to the project, but it is confirmed by site inspection that the project would not be visible from them. To demonstrate that these VSRs have been considered and not mistakenly omitted, they are also included in the assessment.

10.5.20      For the avoidance of doubt, VSRs in the planned developments which, based on latest programme information, will be completed before the completion of the TKO-LT Tunnel have been considered as existing VSRs in this assessment. They are identified in the tables and text with an asterisk (*) to distinguish them from VSRs which are currently in existence.

 


Table 10.5.5 Tseung Kwan O Visually Sensitive Receivers and their Sensitivity

VSR ID No.

Key VSR

No. of Viewers (Many, Medium, Few)

Quality of Existing View (Good, Fair, Poor)

Availability of Alternative Views (Yes, No) If Yes, Amenity Value of Alternative View (Good, Fair, Poor)

Degree of Visibility (Full, Partial, Glimpse)

Duration of View (Long, Medium, Short)

Frequency of View (Frequent, Occasional, Rare)

Sensitivity to Change

(Low, Medium, High)

Construction

Operation

Existing VSRs in TKO

TKO-CDA1A

Existing Residents and
Workers in TKO Area 86 Comprehensive Development Area/ LOHAS Park

Many

Good

Yes (Fair)

Glimpse

Long

Frequent

Medium

Medium

TKO-CDA1B*

Residents in planned new Residential Development at CDA in Area 86/LOHAS Park *

Many

Good

Yes (Good)

Full

Long

Frequent

High

High

TKO-GIC1

Workers in TKO Sewage Treatment Works, Area 85

Few

Poor

Yes (Fair)

Nil

N/A

N/A

Low

Low

TKO-GIC2

Staff and students at TKO Methodist Primary School & Evangelical College

Medium

Fair

Yes (Fair)

Partial

Short

Frequent

Low

Low

TKO-GIC4

Staff and students at Hong Kong Design Institute Campus

Medium

Good

Yes (Fair)

Partial

Short

Frequent

Low

Low

TKO-GIC5

Workers at Hong Kong Movie City

Medium

Fair

Yes (Fair)

Partial

Short

Frequent

Low

Low

TKO-GIC6

Staff and students at Heung To Secondary School and GT College

Medium

Poor

No

Nil

N/A

N/A

Low

Low

TKO-GIC7

Staff and students at Caritas Bianchi College of Careers

Medium

Poor

No

Nil

N/A

N/A

Low

Low

TKO-GIC8

Workers at Logistics Centre and Preliminary Treatment Works and Cargo Handling Basin

Medium

Good

Yes (Good)

Full

Short

Occasional

Low

Low

TKO-GIC9*

Workers in planned GIC Development at TKO Area 67

Medium

Fair

Yes (Fair)

Partial

Medium

Occasional

Low

Low

TKO-GIC10*

Patients and staff at planned private hospital and students and staff at planned Fire Services Training School cum Driving Training School in Area 78

Medium

Fair

Yes (Fair)

Partial

Medium

Occasional

Low

Low

TKO-OU1A

Workers at TKO Industrial Estate

Medium

Good

Yes (Good)

Full

Short

Occasional

Low

Low

TKO-OU2

Visitors of Junk Bay Chinese Permanent Cemetery

Medium

Good

Yes (Good)

Partial

Short

Rare

Low

Low

TKO-O1

Users of Heng Fa Chuen Playground

Medium

Good

Yes (Good)

Full

Medium

Occasional

High

High

TKO-O2

Users of Siu Sai Wan Promenade

Medium

Good

Yes (Good)

Full

Medium

Occasional

High

High

TKO-O3*

Users of planned Open Space at TKO Area 68

Many

Good

Yes (Good)

Full

Medium

Occasional

High

High

TKO-R1

Residents of Heng Fa Chuen

Many

Good

Yes (Good)

Full

Long

Frequent

High

High

TKO-R2

Residents of Bauhinia Garden

Many

Fair

Yes (Fair)

Partial

Long

Frequent

Medium

Medium

TKO-R3

Residents of Ocean Shores (Phases I to III)

Many

Good

Yes (Fair)

Full

Long

Frequent

High

High

TKO-R4

Residents of Metro Town

Many

Fair

Yes (Poor)

Partial

Long

Frequent

Medium

Medium

TKO-R5

Residents of Park Central

Many

Fair

Yes (Poor)

Partial

Long

Frequent

Medium

Medium

TKO-R6

Residents of the Grandiose and TKO Plaza

Many

Fair

Yes (Poor)

Partial

Long

Frequent

Medium

Medium

TKO-R7

Residents of Oscar by the Sea

Many

Fair

Yes (Fair)

Partial

Medium

Frequent

Medium

Medium

TKO-R8

Residents & users of Island Resort residential area and promenade

Many

Good

Yes (Good)

Full

Long

Frequent

High

High

TKO-R9

Residents in Choi Ming Court

Many

Fair

Yes (Poor)

Partial

Long

Frequent

Medium

Medium

TKO-R10

Residents in Chai Wan high rise estates

Many

Good

Yes (Fair)

Full

Long

Frequent

High

High

TKO-R11

Residents in Kin Ming Estate

Many

Poor

Yes (Poor)

Nil

N/A

N/A

Medium

Medium

TKO-R12

Residents in Shin Ming Estate

Many

Poor

Yes (Poor)

Nil

N/A

N/A

Medium

Medium

TKO-R13

Residents at MTRC TKO Station Residential Development

Many

Fair

Yes (Poor)

Partial

Long

Frequent

Medium

Medium

TKO-R14a*

Residents in planned Residential Development on TKO Town Centre South reclamation

OZP Zone R(A)2

Many

Fair

Yes (Poor)

Partial

Long

Frequent

Medium

Medium

TKO-R14b*

Residents in planned Residential Development on TKO Town Centre South reclamation

OZP Zone R(A)3

Many

Fair

Yes (Poor)

Partial

Long

Frequent

Medium

Medium

TKO-R14c*

Residents in planned Residential Development on TKO Town Centre South reclamation OZP Zone R(A)4 Areas (a) & (b)

Many

Fair

Yes (Fair)

Partial

Long

Frequent

Medium

Medium

TKO-R14d*

Residents in planned Residential Development on TKO Town Centre South reclamation

OZP Zone R(A)5

Many

Good

Yes (Fair)

Partial

Long

Frequent

High

High

TKO-R14e*

Residents in planned Residential Development on TKO Town Centre South reclamation

R(A)6 Area (a), (b) & (c) East

 

Many

 

Good

 

Yes (Good)

 

Partial

 

Long

 

Frequent

 

High

 

High

TKO-R14f*

Residents in planned Residential Development on TKO Town Centre South reclamation

R (A)6 Area (a), (b) & (c) West

Many

Good

Yes (Good)

Full

Long

Frequent

High

High

TKO-R15*

Residents in upper floors of planned Residential Group (E) Development in Area 85

Many

Poor

Yes (Fair)

Partial

Long

Frequent

Medium

Medium

TKO-REC1

Hikers along High Junk Peak (Tiu Yue Yung) Country Trail in Clear Water Bay Country Park

Medium

Good

Yes (Good)

Full

Short

Rare

Medium

Medium

TKO-REC2

Hikers along the Wilson Trail to Devil绞s Peak and Chiu Keng Wan Shan

Medium

Good

Yes (Good)

Partial

Short

Rare

Medium

Medium

TKO-REC3A

Visitors of Lei Yue Mun Holiday Village, Lei Yue Mun Park

Medium

Good

Yes (Good)

Full

Short

Rare

Medium

Medium

TKO-REC3B

Visitors of H.K. Museum of Coastal Defence

Medium

Good

Yes (Good)

Full

Short

Rare

Medium

Medium

TKO-REC4

Hikers along Pottinger Trail and Pottinger Peak

Medium

Good

Yes (Good)

Full

Short

Rare

Medium

Medium

TKO-REC5

Hikers at Mount Collinson

Medium

Good

Yes (Good)

Full

Short

Rare

Medium

Medium

TKO-REC6

Hikers at Mount Parker

Medium

Good

Yes (Good)

Full

Short

Rare

Medium

Medium

TKO-T1

Seaborne Leisure Travellers in Junk Bay

Medium

Fair

Yes (Good)

Full

Short

Occasional

Medium

Medium

TKO-T2

Seaborne Leisure Travellers along Lei Yue Mun and Tathong Channel

Many

Fair

Yes (Good)

Full

Short

Occasional

Medium

Medium

TKO-T3

 

Travellers along Wan Po Road

Many

Fair

Yes (Fair)

Partial/ Glimpse

Short

Occasional

Low

Low

TKO-T4

Travellers at TKO MTR Station and along Po Yap Road and Chui Ling Road

Many

Poor

Yes (Poor)

Partial/ Glimpse

Short

Occasional

Low

Low

TKO-T5

Pedestrians on footpath link from Ocean Shores to Junk Bay Chinese Permanent Cemetery

Medium

Good

Yes (Good)

Full

Short

Occasional

Medium

Medium

TKO-T7

Travellers on new Southern Footbridge crossing Eastern Channel

Medium

Good

Yes (Good)

Full

Short

Occasional

Medium

Medium

Planned future VSRs in TKO

TKO-OU1B

Workers in planned TKO Industrial Estate Extension

Medium

Good

Yes (Good)

Full

Short

Occasional

N/A

Low

TKO-REC7

Users of planned recreational facilities at TKO Stage I Landfill, Area 77

Many

Good

Yes (Good)

Full

Medium

Occasional

N/A

Medium

*VSRs in developments planned to be completed before completion of TKO-LT Tunnel

 


Table 10.5.6 Tseung Kwan O Visually Sensitive Receivers and their Magnitude of Change

VSR ID No.

Key VSR

Potential Blockage

of View

(Full/

Partial/Glimpse)

Minimum Viewing Distance (m)

Scale of Develop-ment (Large/

Medium/

Small)

Compati-bility (Good/

Fair/

Poor)

 

Duration of Impacts

(Long/ Medium/ Short)

Revers-ibility of Change (Yes/No)

Magnitude of Impacts (Large/Intermediate/Small/ /Negligible)

Construction

Operation

Construction

Operation

Existing VSRs in TKO

TKO-CDA1A

Residents and
Workers in TKO Area 86 Comprehensive Development Area/ LOHAS Park

Partial

1500m

Large

Fair

Medium

Long

No

Small

Small

TKO-CDA1B*

Residents in planned new Residential Development at CDA in Area 86/LOHAS Park

Partial

1000m

Large

Fair

Medium

Long

No

Large

Large

TKO-GIC1

Workers in TKO Sewage Treatment Works, Area 85

Nil

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

Negligible

Negligible

TKO-GIC2

Staff and students at TKO Methodist Primary School & Evangelical College

Partial

750m

Large

Fair

Medium

Long

No

Small

Small

TKO-GIC4

Staff and students at Hong Kong Design Institute Campus

Partial

50m

Large

Fair

Medium

Long

No

Intermediate

Intermediate

TKO-GIC5

Workers at Hong Kong Movie City

Partial

1750m

Large

Fair

Medium

Long

No

Intermediate

Small

TKO-GIC6

Staff and students at Heung To Secondary School and GT College

 

 

Nil

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

Negligible

Negligible

TKO-GIC7

Staff and students at Caritas Bianchi College of Careers

Nil

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

Negligible

Negligible

TKO-GIC8

Workers at Logistics Centre and Preliminary Treatment Works and Cargo Handling Basin

Partial

3000m

Small

Good

Medium

Long

No

Small

Small

TKO-GIC9*

Future workers in planned GIC Development at TKO Area 67

Partial

50m

Large

Fair

Medium

Long

No

Large

Intermediate

TKO-GIC10*

Patients and staff at planned private hospital and students and staff at planned Fire Services Training School cum Driving Training School in Area 78

Partial

2000m

Medium

Fair

Medium

Long

No

Small

Small

TKO-OU1A

Workers at TKO Industrial Estate

Partial

1500m

Large

Fair

Medium

Long

No

Large

Large

TKO-OU2

Visitors of Junk Bay Chinese Permanent Cemetery

Partial

50m

Large

Fair

Medium

Long

No

Intermediate

Intermediate

TKO-O1

Users of Heng Fa Chuen Playground

Partial

2700m

Small

Good

Medium

Long

No

Small

Small

TKO-O2

Users of Siu Sai Wan Promenade

Partial

3200m

Small

Good

Medium

Long

No

Small

Small

TKO-O3*

Users of planned Open Space at TKO Area 68

 

Partial

500m

Large

Fair

Medium

Long

No

Large

Large

TKO-R1

Residents of Heng Fa Chuen

Partial

2500m

Small

Good

Medium

Long

No

Small

Small

TKO-R2

Residents of Bauhinia Garden

Partial

350m

Large

Fair

Medium

Long

No

Small

Small

TKO-R3

Residents of Ocean Shores (Phases I to III)

Partial

50m

Large

Fair

Medium

Long

No

Large

Large

TKO-R4

Residents of Metro Town